Text Size

Buddha's Words

ABANDONING SORROW

 

Thus have I heard, once in the Jeta Grove the Buddha addressed the monks thus: "Monks, I say that the elimination of the causes of sorrow is for one who knows and sees wisely, not for one who does not know and see wisely. Monks, there are causes of sorrow that should be abandoned by not paying attention to them. There are causes of sorrow that should be abandoned by restraining. There are causes of sorrow that should be abandoned by using. There are causes of sorrow that should be abandoned by enduring. There are causes of sorrow that should be abandoned by removing. There are causes of sorrow that should be abandoned by developing. What causes of sorrow should be abandoned by not paying attention to them? They are those things which, when dwelt upon, give rise to sorrow and which increase existing sorrow. Monks, a well-taught noble disciple, is skilled and disciplined in their Dharma, understands what things are fit for attention and what things are unfit for attention. Since that is so, such a person does not dwell upon to those things unfit for attention and attends to those things fit for attention. What causes of sorrow should be abandoned by restraining? Here a person, reflecting wisely, abides without wanting, with the sense restrained. While causes for sorrow, vexation, and fever might arise in one who is lost in sense experience, there are no causes of sorrow, vexation, and fever for the one who does not become lost in sense experience. What are the causes of sorrow that should be abandoned by using? Here a person, reflecting wisely, uses food neither for amusement nor for intoxication nor for the sake of physical beauty and attractiveness, but only for the endurance and continuance of this body, for ending discomfort, and for assisting the holy life, considering: 'Thus I shall complete old feelings without arousing new grasping and I shall be healthy and blameless and shall live in comfort.' Reflecting wisely, one uses one's resting place only for protection from cold, for protection from heat, for protecting from insects, wind, the sun, creeping things, dangers, and for enjoying retreat. Reflecting wisely, one uses the medicinal requisites only for protection from arisen afflictions and for the benefit of good health. What causes of sorrow should be abandoned by enduring? Here a person, reflecting wisely, bears cold and heat, hunger and thirst, insects, wind, sun, and creeping things; one endures ill-spoken, unwelcome words. One bears bodily feelings that are painful, racking, sharp, piercing, disagreeable, and distressing. While causes of suffering, vexation, and fever may arise in one who does not endure such things, there are no causes of sorrow, vexation, and fever in one who endures them. What cause of sorrow should be abandoned by avoiding? Here a person, reflecting wisely, avoids a wild elephant, a wild horse, a wild bull, a wild dog, a snake, a stump, a bramble patch, a chasm, a cliff, a cesspit, and a sewer. Reflecting wisely, one avoids sitting on unsuitable seats, wandering to unsuitable resorts, and associating with bad friends. While causes of sorrow, vexation, and fever might arise in one who does not avoid these things, there are no causes of sorrow, vexation, and fever in one who avoids them. What cause of sorrow should be abandoned by avoiding? Here a person, reflecting wisely, avoids a wild elephant, a wild horse, a wild bull, a wild dog, a snake, a stump, a bramble patch, a chasm, a cliff, a cesspit, and a sewer. Reflecting wisely, one avoids sitting on unsuitable seats, wandering to unsuitable resorts, and associating with bad friends. While causes of sorrow, vexation, and fever might arise in one who does not avoid these things, there are no causes of sorrow, vexation, and fever in one who avoids them. What causes of sorrow should be abandoned by developing? Here a person, reflecting wisely, develops mindfulness, investigation, energy, rapture, tranquillity, concentration, and equanimity. While causes of sorrow, vexation, and fever might arise in one who does not develop these, there are no causes of sorrow, vexation, or fever in one who develops them." That is how the Buddha spoke. The monks were satisfied and delighted in the Blessed One's words.

 


Some Powerful Words from The Buddha
Practice of Zen
Preaching the Law
Read Lotus Sutra
Guard Lotus Sutra
No End in That Way
Cultivate Mindfulness
Continue and Cease
Mindfulness of Body
Begin and Go On
Guard you own mind
Weighs Both Sides
Having Insight Ourselves
Anger
Faults
Knowing a better way to live
Buddha's Farewell Address
Loving Kindness by The Buddha
The Mind
Preach Various Doctrines
Never be reborn in the cycles of suffering
Practice Our Mind
Be your own island
Worlds are all illusion
The Mind and Practice
Mind like still water
Everything is illustion